Trump’s Space Force! Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin makes a surprise appearance at the State of the Union as the president PROMISES America will resume its manned space program this year

Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin has made a surprise appearance at the State of the Union, as President Trump promised to resume the U.S. manned space program.
One of the first two humans to step foot on the moon, Aldrin was introduced near the beginning of the address, after three D-Day veterans were honored by the president.
‘In 2019, we also celebrate 50 years since brave young pilots flew a quarter of a million miles through space to plant the American flag on the face of the moon,’ Trump said.
Aldrin, wearing an American flag tie, rose and saluted the House chamber to thunderous applause and a standing ovation
Aldrin, wearing an American flag tie, rose and saluted the House chamber to thunderous applause and a standing ovation
Pictured: Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong planting the American flag on the moon in July 1969
Pictured: Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong planting the American flag on the moon in July 1969
‘Half a century later, we are joined by one of the Apollo 11 astronauts who planted that flag, Buzz Aldrin. 
‘Thank you, Buzz. This year, American astronauts will go back to space on American rockets.’
Aldrin, wearing an American flag tie, stood and saluted the House chamber to thunderous applause after the introduction. 
Trump publicly proposed a Space Force in March 2018 as a sixth branch of the United States Armed Forces.
Aldrin supported the initiative in a tweet in August, after a new law was passed to re-establish the U.S. Space Command.
‘One giant leap in the right direction,’ Aldrin wrote.
One of the first two humans to step foot on the Moon, Aldrin was introduced near the beginning of the address by President Trump 
One of the first two humans to step foot on the Moon, Aldrin was introduced near the beginning of the address by President Trump 

WHAT WAS THE APOLLO PROGRAM?

NASA photo taken on July 16, 1969 shows the huge, 363-foot tall Apollo 11 Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT).
NASA photo was taken on July 16, 1969, shows the huge, 363-foot tall Apollo 11 Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT).
Apollo was the NASA programme that launched in 1961 and got a man on the moon.
The first four flights tested the equipment for the Apollo Program and six of the other seven flights managed to land on the moon.
The first manned mission to the moon was Apollo 8 which circled around it on Christmas Eve in 1968 but did not land.
The crew of Apollo 9 spent ten days orbiting Earth and completed the first manned flight of the lunar module – the section of the Apollo rocket that would later land Neil Armstrong on the Moon.  
The Apollo 11 mission was the first on to land on the moon on 20 July 1969.
The capsule landed on the Sea of Tranquillity, carrying mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilots Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.
Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the lunar surface while Collins remained in orbit around the moon. 
When Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon, he said, ‘That’s one small step for (a) man; one giant leap for mankind.’
Apollo 12 landed later that year on 19 November on the Ocean of Storms, writes NASA.  
Apollo 13 was to be the third mission to land on the moon, but just under 56 hours into flight, an oxygen tank explosion forced the crew to cancel the lunar landing and move into the Aquarius lunar module to return back to Earth.  
Apollo 15 was the ninth manned lunar mission in the Apollo space program and considered at the time the most successful manned space flight up to that moment because of its long duration and greater emphasis on scientific exploration than had been possible on previous missions. 
The last Apollo moon landing happened in 1972 after a total of 12 astronauts had touched down on the lunar surface.
Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin unpacking experiments from the Lunar Module on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Photographed by Neil Armstrong, 20 July 1969
Astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin unpacking experiments from the Lunar Module on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Photographed by Neil Armstrong, 20 July 1969
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.